Tag Archives: Food hardship

Hot Meals and Mentoring for Poor Kids in Mongolia

By BGR Staff

One-third of Mongolia’s population experiences extreme poverty and is unable to afford basic food and shelter. The Tibetan monk, Ven. Panchen Ötrul Rinpoche, was determined to do something about this.

Born in Eastern Tibet in 1939 to nomadic parents, Ven. Rinpoche received full monastic ordination in 1961 under His Holiness the Dalai Lama. He completed his formal studies in India and was awarded the highest degree of Geshe Lharampa, equivalent to a Doctorate in Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy. In 1995, the Dalai Lama asked Rinpoche to go to Mongolia to teach Buddhism to the Mongolian people. After his arrival in Mongolia, he set about finding ways to overcome the high levels of poverty he encountered there. He established Asral NGO in 2001 with the objective of keeping families together and preventing children from going onto the streets. Asral is the Mongolian word for “care.”

As part of Asral’s mission, Ven. Rinpoche established the Hot Meal Project in partnership with local government and community leaders. Since 2003, the project has provided essential nutrition to approximately thirty-two children annually ranging in age from six to seventeen, offering access to education they would otherwise have to forgo. In addition to the lunches, Asral further supports the children with mentoring, educational supplies, and vitamins.

Last year, Buddhist Global Relief (BGR) entered upon a partnership with the Washington State-based organization Maitreya Charity, which has worked closely with Ven. Rinpoche to support Asral. In 2018, with the hot meals program underfunded and in jeopardy of ending, BGR awarded a grant to Maitreya Charity to enable Asral to purchase groceries and educational materials, to fund an allowance for teachers, and to provide partial funding of a cook’s position to ensure the continuation of the project for the 2018-2019 school year.

Thirty-two  children were enrolled in the Hot Meal Project at the beginning of the school year, in September, 2018. Two children moved away and four were added, totaling 34 children as of January 2019. Of the 34, 19 are girls and 15 are boys. In the first six months of the grant year, these children have received a daily hot lunch that is eaten in small groups, mentoring before or after school, educational supplies, and advocacy by committed staff, enabling access to education that would otherwise not have been available to them.  A typical lunch is hearty and nutritious and may consist of soup with buckwheat, a main meal of meat, vegetables and potatoes or rice, and fruit juice. For many of the children this meal is often the only substantial meal of the day. 

The program also distributes clothing and vitamins regularly, teaches the children basic hygiene, and offers games and activities for socialization. For mentoring, one teacher specializes in math, a subject that is difficult to master by Mongolian children; the other teacher specializes in the English language. The staff works hard to purchase groceries in the most cost-effective manner possible. This past year, individuals donated $156 worth of groceries to supplement the budget.

Many challenges beset the project. One identified challenge is the maintenance of hygiene standards to prevent the spread of diseases, including sickness from H. Pylori bacteria, common among Mongolians. As a result, a portion of the funds budgeted for the cook’s salary is being used to pay for a newly created cleaner position. The 8.2% annual inflation rate and the rise in cost of food prices by 9% make it difficult to stay within the budget. Also, Mongolian law dictates the minimum wage rate, which rose in January 2019.

Further, the staff has identified poor dentition as a significant problem, with 13 of the 16 children examined recently by volunteer dental professionals having an average of 4 to 5 dental cavities. When asked what would help the Hot Meal Project improve its goal of treating the child holistically, staff has stated that a well-stocked children’s library, a dish sterilizer, daily vitamins, and funds for dental work partially comprise their list of needed items. With their capacity to serve 50 children, additional funding would enable the project to serve more than the present 34 children.

Beneficiary Stories

Namuunaa is a 14-year old girl who is in the eighth grade at the 113th school in the Bayangol district. She has two brothers. Her older brother is married and the family lives in a ger. He works for a carbon-paper-making company. The second brother is 15 years old and attends the same school as Namuunaa. He lives in the same ger with his girlfriend and their newborn child. Both brothers are extremely poor. These three siblings’ father died in a car accident and their mother left the family a long time ago. She had a drinking problem and her whereabouts are unknown.

Namuunaa lives with her deceased father’s older brother’s wife. She does not have a secure, permanent place to live and moves between her relatives’ homes. She looks after her relatives’ children and helps around the house. She has little time for studying or attending other activities at school. She is interested in the social sciences. She is quiet, humble, a very good student and is kind to others. Her health is not good; she has stomach problems and her teeth need a good deal of dental work. She is not dressed adequately for winter, and sometimes goes to the Asral Center without warm shoes.

The Hot Meal Project provides the nutrition to help Namuunaa survive the harsh winter, keeps her within a circle of friends, and provides a quiet space where she can study. Last year, Asral Center found a donor to pay for some of her dental work, which has helped to improve her studies, sleep well without dental pain, smile more, and chew her food better. When Panchen Otrul Rinpoche visited in summer, 2018, she received donated clothes that helped to build her confidence to remain in school.

Khuselbaatar and Khurelbaatar are 9-year-old twin boys. They are third graders who attend the 113th school in the Bayangol district. Their father is deceased and they live with their mother and seven siblings. The mother is a seamstress who is unable to find work. She collects bottles and other types of garbage. The family has no stable income except for the US $8.00 per month per child subsidy that the government provides for every child under 18 years of age. The family struggles to pay for food and electricity. The children share their books, school bags, uniforms, shoes, and outdoor winter clothes. During the winter months, the family heats their small house with collected old tires and garbage.

These twins started going to school this year, not having attended school from age 6 to 9. Due to their late start, they lag behind their peers. At home, the children do their homework by candle light. The Hot Meal Project provides a free hot lunch after school and volunteer teacher Dagdan is providing extra tutoring sessions, resulting in some visible improvement.

Egshiglen, an 11-year-old girl, and Enkhtur, a 6-year-old boy are siblings. They both go to the 113th school in the Bayangol district. Egshiglen is in the fifth grade and Enkhtur is in the first grade. Their father died in a car accident in 2012. They live with their mother and grandmother. The mother’s speech disability prevents her from working. Although this school is government funded, its teachers regularly ask for money for books and other expenses. As a result, the mother cleans their school instead. She is extremely committed to obtaining a good education for both children.

Both children work hard at their studies and are very interested in their school work. Egshiglen likes her Mongolian language classes and Enkhtur likes his math classes. The family’s ger is very old and in poor condition; it leaks in the summer and loses heat quickly in the winter. It is heated with collected garbage because they cannot afford to buy coal. The children do not have adequate winter clothes and share their clothes. During a recent home visit, Enkhtur was dressed in his sister’s winter clothes, pants and summer shoes, and Egshiglen did not have winter shoes.

The project allows the siblings to concentrate on their studies in a peaceful and friendly setting with necessary supplies. Staff has built up their motivation and confidence to remain in school and to feel positive about their future. Their health is good, but they need a great deal of dental work.

This blogpost draws upon the six-months report that Maitreya Charity recently provided to BGR. All photos courtesy of Maitreya Charity.

 

 

 

Advertisements

BGR Donates to Help Puerto Rico and Rohingya Refugees

By BGR Staff

This past week the BGR Board voted to approve emergency grants of $5,000 each to two organizations working with people in distress: to Oxfam America, which is hard at work in Puerto Rico, filling in where the U.S. government effort has been slow and inadequate; and to the World Food Programme, which has been providing urgently needed food aid to the Rohingya refugees who have fled violence in their native Myanmar and taken refuge in neighboring Bangladesh. The statements that follow have been adopted from reports by the two organizations.

From Oxfam America, on the situation in Puerto Rico

Since Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, millions of its residents, who are U.S. citizens, have been struggling to survive without food, clean water, or electricity. Although they have the resources, the U.S. government’s emergency response has been slow and inadequate. For this reason, Oxfam America has stepped in to make sure the island’s 3.4 million residents receive immediate aid. Continue reading

Resilient Livelihoods in Northern India

By Patricia Brick

Jay Devi, a farmer in Pritampur village in Uttar Pradesh, India, struggled for years to earn enough from the sale of her crops to pay for the fertilizers and pesticides she needed for her fields. Like many other women farmers in the region, she was entirely dependent upon purchased chemical fertilizers and pesticides for her crops of beans, corn, tomatoes, okra, and pumpkins. But the high cost of these products cut sharply into her earnings. She dreamed of saving enough money to purchase a water pump for her home so that she would no longer have to walk to a communal well for drinking water. But her profits were never enough; some seasons she could not even afford to buy the chemicals she needed, and as a result her crop yields suffered further.
Continue reading

Projects for Fiscal Year 2017–18—Part 3

By BGR Staff

10. Haiti: A School Feeding Program for Students in Jacmel

BGR’s partner in this project, the Art Creation Foundation for Children (ACFFC), is a US-based organization (founded 1999) whose mission is “to build a passionate community of future leaders, visionaries and dynamic thinkers who are empowered to better their lives and their world through the arts and education in Jacmel, Haiti.” The partnership with BGR will provide the students at ACFFC with at least one nutritious, filling meal per day on each of the six days of the week they attend school. Many children in Haiti will not attend daily education programs if meals are not a component of the program. For many of the students enrolled at ACFFC, the meals they receive there are their only opportunity to eat. Without the feeding program many of the children would spend their days either looking for food or working rather than attending school or being part of an art program. The feeding program is implemented by the staff of three kitchen personnel who prepare a minimum of 360 meals per week. BGR’s grant covers about a third of the total budget for the program. Annually renewable program

11. Haiti: Improved Production and Diversification of Crops in the Artibonite Valley

This project, with our partner Oxfam America, supports improved rice production and backyard vegetable gardening in the Artibonite Valley in Haiti. Agricultural activity is one of the main sources of income for this population, focused on rice produced in the Artibonite Valley. Attempts to increase the production of rice face structural constraints. In spite of this, Oxfam has worked for approximately five years to help smallholder producers to develop the potential for rice cultivation and maintain the livelihoods of poor families. Previous projects have encouraged the adoption of innovative farming practices such as the Sustainable Rice Intensification (SRI) techniques, irrigation, post-harvest improvements, and improving production practices in vegetable gardening.

The proposed project will leverage the grant from Buddhist Global Relief to expand upon existing activities in the small rural community of Délogner, in the third communal section of Petite-Rivière. This vulnerable population (pop. 5,139, 90% poverty rate, 50% food insecure) experienced a flood in January 2017, which nearly annihilated agricultural production, their primary means of subsistence. By reinforcing ongoing efforts in response to this recent shock, the project will directly reach 224 beneficiaries through a suite of activities including SRI training, establishment of an agricultural credit fund, rehabilitation of irrigation infrastructures (5 km of canals), agricultural diversification with backyard vegetable gardening, provision of specialized SRI equipment and plastic sheeting for drying of harvested rice, establishment of collective local nurseries, and local partner capacity building. Continue reading

BGR Provides Emergency Relief to Countries Facing Famine and Floods

by BGR Staff

At the recent annual projects meeting on May 7th, the BGR board voted to provide $20,000 for emergency relief in four countries currently affected by near-famine conditions: South Sudan, Somalia, Nigeria, and Yemen. This donation has been divided evenly between two organizations working in the affected countries: the World Food Program and Oxfam America. This is in addition to the $10,000 donation sent this past March to the World Food Programme for assistance to the four countries.

For separate reports on conditions in those countries, see the website of the World Food Programme. According to their report, 20 million people in these countries are suffering from extreme food shortages. The lives of many hang in the balance, yet WFP has at present received only 25% of the monetary assistance they require to tackle the crisis.

This past week BGR also provided $10,000 in emergency aid to Sri Lanka, which has been ravaged by virulent floods that have swept across the country, inundating towns and villages, displacing half a million people, and claiming over 200 lives. The contribution was divided between two organizations working in Sri Lanka: Sarvodaya, the largest grass-roots village renewal movement in the country, and a smaller humanitarian organization, Karuna Trust.

Although BGR is not an emergency relief organization but focuses on intentional projects that address chronic hunger and malnutrition, on occasion we find it necessary to respond to heartrending emergencies in ways that are feasible within the limits of our budget.

Reconnecting Homeless Youth to Food, the Earth, and Spirit

Taz Tagore

Grants from BGR have provided not only food to homeless youth, but opportunities for companionship and a sense of belonging.

For the past 10 years, the Reciprocity Foundation has worked tirelessly to support homeless and foster-care youth aged 13–26 in their transformation from impoverished persons living in a shelter to educated, employed youngsters playing a leadership role in society. With BGR support, Reciprocity is expanding its Urban Food Project, taking youth upstate to spend time working on small organic farms where they learn the basics of planting, harvesting, and cooking fresh organic meals. Below is a six-months report from Reciprocity Foundation co-founder Taz Tagore.

The second half of 2016 was one of the most meaningful and challenging periods in our organization’s history! It has been a year of great change—some of the changes involved loss and others involved finding new inspiration, allies, and community.  While I want to summarize where we have been in 2016, I also want to address the enormous energy building at Reciprocity to invent a more courageous, visionary and loving model for transformation in the world. But first, our work in the past year…
Continue reading

BGR Provides Emergency Donations to Help Syrian Refugees

BGR Staff 

ALEPPO, SYRIA - FEBRUARY 11: A Syrian 2 year old baby Zehra and Eye Halip, who fled bombing in Aleppo, are seen with their mother Belkiz Halip at a tent city close to the Bab al-Salam border crossing on Turkish-Syrian border near Azaz town of Aleppo, Syria on February 11, 2016. Russian airstrikes have recently forced some 40,000 people to flee their homes in Syrias northern city of Aleppo. (Photo by Fatih Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

A Syrian 2 year old baby Zehra and Eye Halip, who fled bombing in Aleppo, are seen with their mother Belkiz Halip at a tent city close to the Bab al-Salam border crossing on Turkish-Syrian border near Azaz town of Aleppo, Syria on February 11, 2016. Russian airstrikes have recently forced some 40,000 people to flee their homes in Syrias northern city of Aleppo. (Photo by Fatih Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

In late August, Buddhist Global Relief made emergency donations of $5,000 each to two respected aid organizations assisting refugees fleeing from the fighting in Syria. One is Oxfam America; the other is CARE. Driven from their homes, many families daily risk their lives in a dangerous flight for safety. Millions of refugees from Syria and other Middle Eastern countries– many of them children – travel long distances to other lands where they hope to find a place of safety and refuge. Hundreds of thousands of displaced people, both within Syria and outside, are in critical need of adequate food, shelter, healthcare, and warm clothes.

BGR’s donations to CARE and Oxfam will:

  • Deliver food baskets, baby items, and other emergency essentials to families cut off from supplies.
  • Provide access to clean water, including water purification tablets for individual families.
  • Increase access to health care for pregnant women and communities affected by conflict.

Readers who wish to help Syrian refugees should contribute directly to these two organizations, or to other organizations with a similar mission, rather than to Buddhist Global Relief.